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We are conveniently located in the South Park Center (the former AT&T/ Transamerica Center)

We are conveniently located in the South Park Center
(the former AT&T/ Transamerica Center)

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We are conveniently located in the South Park Center (the former AT&T/ Transamerica Center)
Call 213-749-3461 to schedule an eye exam
Hablamos Espanol. Es un placer Servirle.

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Home » Eye Care Services » Management of Ocular Diseases » Glaucoma Testing and Treatment

Glaucoma Testing and Treatment

What Is a Glaucoma Test?

Glaucoma is the generalized name for a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve of the eye, preventing the eye from sending accurate visual information to the brain. Glaucoma tests are designed to test your eyes for one of the key symptoms of the disease—increased eye pressure—however only a comprehensive eye exam can reveal whether or not you have glaucoma. Increased pressure inside the eye is often a key indicator of glaucoma, though not exclusively so. Eye doctors can use a number of tests for eye pressure, but will, by default, check for signs of glaucoma as part of a detailed examination of the retina—the light sensitive area at the back of the eye responsible for processing images.

How Does Glaucoma Testing Work?

A glaucoma test is usually part of a routine eye exam. Both types of glaucoma tests measure internal pressure of the eye.

One glaucoma test involves measuring what happens when a puff of air is blown across the surface of the eye. (A puff test) Another test uses a special device (in conjunction with eye-numbing drops) to “touch” the surface of the eye to measure eye pressure.

While increased eye pressure is a key indicator of the disease, it does not necessarily mean you have a glaucoma diagnosis. In fact, the only way to detect glaucoma is to have a detailed, comprehensive eye exam that often includes dilation of the pupils.

So “true” glaucoma testing actually involves examining the retina and optic nerve at the back of the eye for signs of the disease.

Learn More

Glaucoma can cause slight to severe vision loss, and is often discovered only after the disease is present—that’s why glaucoma testing is so important.

 

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

COVID-19 (coronavirus)

As the facts and situation around COVID-19 (coronavirus) continue to evolve, and in compliance with the recommendations by the CDC, our practice is suspending non-essential or non-urgent eye care effective immediately until further notice.

We believe by taking these extraordinary precautions along with other health care facilities, collectively we can make a difference in helping control the spread of the COVID-19 virus. We recognize the gravity of these extreme measures and remain sensitive to your eye care priorities.

We will be available by phone, voicemail, text and email on a limited basis.We understand that some of you may have eyeglass and/or contact lens orders to pick up.  We will be able to ship these orders to you at your request.

We encourage you to wear your eyeglasses as much as possible especially if your contact lens supply is running low or if you are in need of contact lenses you may visit our online store at http://www.yourlens.com/ceciliaperezod to place an order.  As a courtesy to our loyal patients, we will extend contact lens prescription for 2 months and ship them to you at no charge. In the meantime, please do not over wear your contact lenses for your own safety. Lately there has been misleading information in the press, regarding the use of contact lenses during the COVID-19 spread.  The American Academy of Optometry released this statement regarding contact lens wear: To prevent contact lens infections of all kinds: bacterial, viral, and fungal, contact lens wearers must:

  1. Wash hands thoroughly, at least 20 seconds, with soap and water, and dry hands completely.
  2. Use daily disposable contact lenses if possible.
  3. If solutions are required, use them appropriately. Specifically, do not re-use solutions.
  4. Replace cases monthly or more frequently. Rinse, wipe, and air dry contact lens cases every day.
  5. Do not wear contact lenses when you are ill.

If you have a medical eye emergency ​please call 911 or go to the nearest urgent care facility.Thank you for your trust and understanding during these challenging times.  We always appreciate your loyalty and support!

Stay safe and healthy.

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We will be available by phone, text and email on a limited basis.

Email: cperezoptometry@yahoo.com

Call and text: (213)749-3461

From March 20th through March 30th or until further notice.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

Thank you.

Need contacts? please visit our online web store:

http://www.yourlens.com/ceciliaperezod